Orange is the New Black Full series coverage on Vulture "What kind of Litchfield is a Litchfield without Piper? She might be the Trojan Horse through which the stories of the other inmates are told, but I honestly didn’t even realize she wasn’t in this episode until the very end. I like Piper; I just like the other inmatesmore. Their stories give way to a broader slice of humanity, and do more to reinforce the way systemic oppression works on multiple levels." Season 2 Episode 2, "Cold Comfort"                                                                                                  • • •  "What this show continues to do well is showcase the complicated private lives of undervalued women, and Lorna fits the bill to a T. She lives in a chaotic house with most of her family, has very little mental and emotional space of her own, and seems stuck in a juvenile fantasy version of life, as evidenced by the huge collage of models and magazine-perfect lifestyle images on her wall. She’s still tragic in that way — childlike bordering on childish — but now we can add a new layer of intense danger to her repertoire. At her core, she just wants to love and be loved; why are some people automatically excluded from that possibility? And when you follow the prescription for love that you’ve been spoon-fed culturally and it doesn’t work, why wouldn’t you snap?" Season 2 Episode 4, "We'll Be Married"                                                                                                   • • •  "Caputo looks like a low-budget the Edge while his friends sing about reverse vasectomies and sorcerers. Healy, dejected and hurt by a wife who blows him off constantly, happens upon Caputo’s band one night and forms a brotherly, booze-soaked bond. After they laugh about Figueroa being a 'cunt-faced witch monster,' Healy keeps the hate train going by harkening back to the good-old days when he would talk directly to the warden since he 'hates talking to women about women’s issues.' It’s not just Figueroa; Healy hates women. He thinks he’s found a partner in crime in Caputo, but Caputo genuinely wants to help the inmates, saying the 'least we should do is keep these women safe and clean.' Let’s remember that he routinely jerks off to inmates in his office before we give him the Susan B. Anthony Award for Not Being a Total Cock, but at least his intentions are pure when it comes to his job." Season 2 Episode 5, "Turf Wars"

Orange is the New Black
Full series coverage on Vulture

"What kind of Litchfield is a Litchfield without Piper? She might be the Trojan Horse through which the stories of the other inmates are told, but I honestly didn’t even realize she wasn’t in this episode until the very end. I like Piper; I just like the other inmatesmore. Their stories give way to a broader slice of humanity, and do more to reinforce the way systemic oppression works on multiple levels."
Season 2 Episode 2, "Cold Comfort"

                                                                                                 • • • 

"What this show continues to do well is showcase the complicated private lives of undervalued women, and Lorna fits the bill to a T. She lives in a chaotic house with most of her family, has very little mental and emotional space of her own, and seems stuck in a juvenile fantasy version of life, as evidenced by the huge collage of models and magazine-perfect lifestyle images on her wall. She’s still tragic in that way — childlike bordering on childish — but now we can add a new layer of intense danger to her repertoire. At her core, she just wants to love and be loved; why are some people automatically excluded from that possibility? And when you follow the prescription for love that you’ve been spoon-fed culturally and it doesn’t work, why wouldn’t you snap?"
Season 2 Episode 4, "We'll Be Married"

                                                                                                  • • • 

"Caputo looks like a low-budget the Edge while his friends sing about reverse vasectomies and sorcerers. Healy, dejected and hurt by a wife who blows him off constantly, happens upon Caputo’s band one night and forms a brotherly, booze-soaked bond. After they laugh about Figueroa being a 'cunt-faced witch monster,' Healy keeps the hate train going by harkening back to the good-old days when he would talk directly to the warden since he 'hates talking to women about women’s issues.' It’s not just Figueroa; Healy hates women. He thinks he’s found a partner in crime in Caputo, but Caputo genuinely wants to help the inmates, saying the 'least we should do is keep these women safe and clean.' Let’s remember that he routinely jerks off to inmates in his office before we give him the Susan B. Anthony Award for Not Being a Total Cock, but at least his intentions are pure when it comes to his job."
Season 2 Episode 5, "Turf Wars"